Archive for ‘herstory’

May 18, 2013

Radfem Hub is now an archives

by admin

After almost two years of herstorical collective blogging, Radfem Hub is now reopened as an archives.

“The Hub” was a collective radical feminist blog and its purpose was to post fresh, original radfem content, provide a male-free and safe platform for women to discuss, and promote radical feminist perspectives and interests.

The original contributors were, in order of appearance:

  • FCM
  • Allecto
  • Cherryblossomlife
  • Undercoverpunk
  • Rainsinger
  • Lishra
  • Easilyriled
  • Loretta Kemsley
  • Zeph
  • No Anodyne
  • Miska
  • Feminist at Sea
  • Gallus Mag

Later contributors were:

December 8, 2012

Back from the London Feminist Film Festival

by admin

By Witchwind

These 4 days of feminist film festival in London have brought me back the hope, the sisterly, positive and creative energy that Patriarchy and men were stealing away from me for the last few months of activism. Being in the company of radical feminists from different parts of the world and spending entire days watching feminist films about women bravely fighting against men’s violence, bonding together, pushing the boundaries of their captivity in the male system and creating new worlds of their own, was enough to fill me with renewed joy and fire. The number and quality of films shown was truly impressive, most of which I had not seen before. I was amazed by how refreshingly radical some of the films and debates were, the organisers had done a great job at selecting the films and panellists from many different backgrounds.

LFFF_logo

September 7, 2012

Sisterhood in application (Part three)

by Guest Blogger

Guest post by Féministe radicale francophone 

Part III: Structuring our resistance

Part I is here, Part II is here.

This is the final part of the series on sisterhood in application. After looking at the consequences of trauma induced by male violence on our groups and how masculinist abuse operates in women-only feminist spaces, in this part I will look at group structure and how certain kinds of structures may favour effective political work and healthy relations in feminist activism. By group structure, I mean not only the structure of relations between the women within a group, but also the way actions are constructed: the kind of priorities established, the way in which objectives are pursued, goals articulated, the strategies or means chosen for their implementation.

August 28, 2012

Sisterhood in Application (Part Two)

by Guest Blogger

Guest post by Féministe radicale francophone

Part II: A right and obligation to preserve ourselves.

Part I is here.

For many of us, feminism may be about the only thing that clings us to life and hope. Without sorority and feminism, many of us would be dead, would still be heavily controlled by men or have seeped into madness. This existential relation to feminism means that conflicts or treasons within our groups may be all the more difficult to cope with when they occur, because it threatens the little haven of safety and sanity we might have managed to create. Our wounds are still bleeding, our hearts scorched: blows may be fatal or devastating, and we often have nowhere else to go.

August 13, 2012

HUB reaches blogging milestone: 500,000 hits and counting

by FCM

This week, thanks to our readers, writers and our wonderful guest-bloggers, the HUB has reached the milestone of 500,000 pageviews.  While this is a very tiny number compared to the amount of traffic any number of mainstream blogs attract in a month, a week, or even a single day, considering that one-million pageviews is a milestone that most blogs never reach, and considering how marginalized radical feminism is, this number is significant and encouraging.

So what has brought HUB to this place, since its beginnings on May 18, 2011?  Read on to see significant events in our herstory, including links to our top posts, an opportunity to revisit our wonderful guest posts, and more.

August 9, 2012

Sisterhood in application (Part One)

by Guest Blogger

Guest post by Féministe radicale francophone

Article I of III: Taking into account the imprint of devastation on our collectives. 

What took me to write this series on sisterhood is a situation of emergency, in which our solidarity and collective resistances are continually under threat or sabotaged by the rifts men have created in ourselves and between ourselves.[1] Men not only attack us externally but corrode us deeply from the inside so we fissure internally and then displace the violence onto ourselves and other women.[2] This way men make sure we never have the strength and cohesiveness to build a viable alternative to their necrophiliac system, so we don’t become solid enough to put their war to an end – let alone have the material capacity to do so. Although this issue is as old as men’s rule over women, the amnesia, genocide and erasure of women[3] means that the emergency seems to be as new today as it was yesterday: with much despair, I have seen collective after collective bitterly imploding, being infiltrated or taken down by those robotically defending men’s war against us.

July 22, 2012

London Radical Feminist Conference, July 2012

by Badhbh Catha

Statement from organisers

This July saw radical feminists from across the globe converge in London for the first women-only, radical feminist conference in 25 years.

What happened was important, urgent and necessary. Women of all ages and from many different backgrounds connected, discussed and organised, and the result was truly electrifying.

The agenda of the conference was shaped by some of the most significant issues affecting women today, with a particular focus on male violence against women and girls in all its forms.

July 11, 2012

What About the Men? Now and Then.

by Guest Blogger

Guest post by Luckynickl

A little over a year ago in May, 2011, Ms. Julie Bindel wrote a fabulous piece here at the Hub titled, “What About The Men?”  The piece was radical and amazing.  Late last night, I ran across this post over at Gender Trender.  It’s an interview of Juile Bindel by male “transgender” Paris Lees conducted earlier this year.  Apparently, in the year since she first wrote for the Hub, Ms. Bindel has done an about-face on the issue of “What about the men?”.

I can only wonder, what happened between now and then?  Are aliens abducting radical feminists and replacing them with pod people?!

Back then, Julie Bindel was defending women-only space and saying how not enough has changed to invite men to the party.  Some excerpts from Julie Bindel’s post at the Hub:

June 29, 2012

Why I Won’t Be Going to MichFest This Year

by Guest Blogger

Guest post by Sapphocles

Last year, I sent the following directly to Lisa Vogel as well as posting it to the MichFest and Facebook Womyn MichFest boards. I got loads of supportive responses from individual women, but nothing from Lisa, unless you count the shutting down of any discussion of this issue on the “official” MichFest boards as a sort of response. Or the blind eye that the she and the other organizers seem willing to turn toward Scout and other long-time Festies who have gotten caught up in the whole trans* delusion. As much as I hate to admit it, MichFest no longer feels like safe space to me.

June 26, 2012

Carrying a Sheila Jeffreys sign at Dyke March is inappropriate? What?

by FCM

As is often the case with misogynists and anti-feminists, the trans horde that took advantage of the “inclusivity” (read: a transwoman helped organize the march, and woe be unto anyone who crosses men who demand access to woman-only space in general) of NYC Dyke March — and others who weren’t even there — don’t seem to have read a word of anything Sheila Jeffreys has actually written.  If they had read her, how could it have rationally been said that Jeffreys — a pro-female, pro-lesbian writer — and her work had no place at a lesbian-centered event?

Or, perhaps they read a couple of words, saw something they didn’t like, and threw away the rest?  “The rest” being Sheila Jeffreys’s entire life’s work of pro-female, pro-lesbian, PIV-critical radical feminist analysis which spans decades and examines women’s lives from pre-WWI — a body of work from which modern women can draw many parallels, recognize obvious patterns in how women are oppressed by men over time, and call age-old bullshit when we see it, because we are never, ever allowed to see it.  Women’s history is routinely erased, and this is a deliberate political strategy to keep women as ignorant of patriarchal context and as oppressed — and as complicit in our own oppression — as possible.